Insulin Resistance: Best foods for IR

It seems to me that there are a whole lot of articles out there about what you should NOT eat if you have PCOS or IR. Here are some great things to think about from LiveStrong of what you CAN eat if you are like me with PCOS/IR.

Fruits and Vegetables

The Best Foods for Insulin Resistance

Fruits and vegetables are natural sources of vitamins and minerals, including antioxidants which help the body combat and prevent disease. They also contain fiber, which is recommended for healthy weight management and improved digestive health. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables can be a helpful means toward reducing one’s risk for insulin resistance. Choose a variety of colorful, fresh fruits and vegetables on a regular, ongoing basis for the best potential results. Frozen or dried fruits and vegetables are a valuable secondary option and can be kept on hand for long periods of time and contain few artificial ingredients or preservatives.

Monounsaturated Fats

The Best Foods for Insulin Resistance
Monounsaturated fats, or plant-based fats found in olive oil, canola oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, avocados, peanut butter, many nuts and seeds, are healthy substitutes for saturated or trans fats–fats associated with increased risk for heart disease. According to research published in the journal of the American Diabetes Association in 2007, intake of monounsaturated fats is linked with decreased fat distribution in those who are insulin resistant. Replace saturated fats, such as butter, whole milk, cream and deep-fried foods with healthier fat alternatives. Olive and canola oil are positive alternatives to butter. Grilled, baked and steamed dishes are preferred over deep-fried foods for those with insulin resistance. Since fat is dense in calories, keep portions sizes modest for best benefits.

Whole Grains

The Best Foods for Insulin ResistanceWhole grains, such as spelt, oats, bulgur, whole wheat and barley, provide a variety of nutrients, including vitamins, minerals and soluble fiber. According to findings published in the “European Journal of Clinical Nutrition” in 2007, consumption of whole grains is associated with reduced risk for insulin resistance. Replace enriched breads, cereals, pasta, rice and snack foods with whole grain equivalents. Whole grain breads, long-grain brown rice, oats and snack foods featuring whole grain ingredients support healthy blood sugar management and overall physical health. Consume a variety of whole grains regularly to attain most benefits.

Here is the full article that helped inform this post: http://www.livestrong.com/article/74703-foods-insulin-resistance/

Carbs and I got back together this weekend…and now I am tired and wanting more!

This past weekend carbs and I definitely got back together. In a big way. One of my best friends and her husband were visiting us in LA from Nor Cal, so we were constantly eating out and overindulging. We did get a great hike by the Hollywood sign in, but the weekend was filled with all you can eat brunches, mimosas, and late night pizza deliveries. While this was all fun and good at the time, I have been VERY tired this week and craving more carbs.

Confession: last night I got home much earlier than my husband and was starving. I had a healthy low carb lunch, but by the time I was home I wanted whatever I could get my hands on. Unfortunately for my PCOS and IR, leftover pizza won the no carb battle.

As I explore the challenges of this new lifestyle, it has been helping me to really understand the impact carbs have on my body. The more I know, the harder it is for me to get back together with carbs by staying strong in my decision for  us to break up.

Here is some of the info I found to help me stay strong and just say no to carbs:

Why are carbs making me tired?

Insulin resistance is a process in which the body is inefficient at managing sugars and starches you have eaten in your diet. When you eat a carbohydrate, such as a piece of bread or something sweet like ice cream, your body releases insulin from your pancreas to process that sugar. Without insulin, you would not be able to assimilate this sugar, called glucose, from your blood stream into your liver and muscles. In insulin resistance, your body makes too much insulin for the amount of carbohydrate consumed. This extra insulin is what causes so many of the listed problems, both functional problems (those which precede pathological), as well as pathological problems (those with tissue alterations.) Initially, the extra insulin often ends up processing sugar too rapidly and blood glucose levels are driven too low. This is called hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. This adds stress to the body and causes the production of other hormones (especially adrenal gland hormones like cortisol), which increase blood sugar levels. As CI gets worse, more and more insulin is needed to process a small amount of sugar. The insulin eventually becomes ineffective at driving the sugar into the cells where the nourishment is needed. The cells have become resistant to the insulin.

As CI is developing, the extra stress on the hormonal system, particularly to the adrenal glands, overworks these organs. This results in a complex pattern of symptoms that differ from person to person.

Symptoms of CI include but are not limited to sleepiness, drowsiness, lack of concentration, or a feeling of being bloated after a meal, especially one containing sweet foods or starches. Always feeling hungry or having weak legs or knees after eating is also a symptom of CI. These are just a few of the functional symptoms.

All of this explains why I have been so incredibly tired…especially the more carbs I eat.

Why does eating carbs cause me to want more carbs?

Sugary foods and drinks, white bread and other processed carbohydrates that are known to cause abrupt spikes and falls in blood sugar appear to stimulate parts of the brain involved in hunger, craving and reward, the new research shows. The findings, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggest that these so-called high-glycemic foods influence the brain in a way that might drive some people to overeat.

For those who are particularly susceptible to these effects, avoiding refined carbohydrates might reduce urges and potentially help control weight, said Dr. David Ludwig, the lead author of the study and the director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Also, research suggests that when blood sugar levels plummet, people have a tendency to seek out foods that can restore it quickly, and this may set up a cycle of overeating driven by high-glycemic foods, Dr. Ludwig said. “It makes sense that the brain would direct us to foods that would rescue blood sugar,” he said. “That’s a normal protective mechanism.”

Makes a lot of sense why I am wanting more carbs…my body thinks it is a reward and is wanting to restore low blood sugars when my levels plummet after they spike. I also have heard from a lot of other people that it is hard to change the mentality that a whole day or even week is wasted once you slip up on your diet. Have to take it a meal at a time…

Getting back on track:

Knowing all this, I am proud to say I made a healthy choice for lunch today:

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Greek salad with fresh feta and grilled chicken kabob. I especially love the garlic sauce many Mediterranean or Lebanese restaurants have. It is just garlic, lemon, olive oil, and ice!

Here are some great articles that helped inform this post:

Blogging while working is TOUGH: 4 Survival tips for balance

“Happiness is not a matter of intensity but of balance, order, rhythm and harmony.” ~Thomas Merton

So…what’s up, friends? It has been a while. I promise I didn’t want to breakup with you…this breakup is about carbs, not my followers!

It has become painfully clear that blogging and working makes for a very difficult life balance. I found that my time with my husband and pups was getting majorly impacted and if it wasn’t that, then my sleep hours took a hit.

Like most things you love…I felt like something has been missing these last couple weeks without the happiness that writing to help others was giving me. With the hope to keep my account of my carb breakup in tact, here are some helpful tips and tricks to keep the blog going. For all you writers out there…hope this is helpful for you too!

1.) Carry a notebook with you. Sometimes you can get an idea for an excellent post when you are at work, hanging out with your friends or when you just woke up. While you won’t always have the opportunity to write this post right away you can jot it down in an old-fashioned notebook or even on your smartphone. When it is time for your next blog posts you will have an excellent idea waiting for you. I have found keeping a running list of upcoming topics has also been helpful

2.) Develop a routine that is non-negotiable. So much of my life is focused on schedules and deadlines. While I hate to hinder my passion for writing, I need to realize that to have balance…a set schedule for blogging will be key. My hope is to make this time either Friday afternoons (I am lucky enough to work for a company with early release every Friday) or Sunday nights. Since life is a moving target, I will be flexible with when I will write…but will commit to 2 hours at least every week

3.) Schedule daily posts. Once the content is written over the weekend, schedule the posts throughout the week so they are up and running without distracting from my day job.

4.) Work on your dream every day, knowing there are no guarantees and that it may take a long time to make the kind of progress that allows you to devote your full-time energy to your passion.

Here are some awesome articles from other bloggers on how to balance writing and working:

#MyCarbBreakup Recipe: Baked Cheese Chips

Since breaking up with carbs, I have really missed chips and crackers. I prefer salty over sweet, and love a good crunch. I have mentioned before that cheese has been my saving grace to get me through my breakup…and cheese comes to the rescue again with this delicious, easy, low carb snack.

Pinterest is amazing and my saving grace. This (and likely all the recipes I share) will be brough to you by Pinterest.

In the original recipe, she shreds the cheese and adds seasonings. You can go all out and shred the cheese if you so choose, but I am all about simplifying, so I just took the cheese and sliced it into small circles.

Here is what you will need:

  • Cheese of your choice. This time I used mild cheddar
  • Parchment paper-must be parchment
  • Baking sheet
  • Paper towel
  • Sour Cream
  • Salsa

Here’s what you do:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. While the oven is doing its thang, cut up your cheese. 
  2. Lay the parchment paper on the baking sheet and place the cheese on the parchment paper. Don’t over crowd them, they will spread out.
  3. Bake until bubbly and brown, about 10 minutes. Once you take them out of the oven, place the crispy cheese on paper towel and blot with another piece of paper towel. You don’t realize how greasy cheese is until you cook or bake with it.

You can dip these in sour cream mixed with your favorite salsa!

Here is where I found this recipe:

Progress Check-In: Eating late and weight gain

It has been my routine to weigh myself every Thursday, first thing in the morning, to check on my progress. As I continue down my journey of fighting Insulin Resistance and PCOS, I hope to document my progress every Thursday along with tips that can hopefully help you as you journey toward a healthier, happier you.

Before I jump into the specific progress of this week, I think it is worth capturing the progress I have already made. When I was first diagnosed with Insulin Resistance and PCOS, I was overweight and my testosterone levels were at about 90 (an average woman is about 40 and below). Since being on a low carb diet and taking medications prescribed by my Endocriologist, I am down 9 pounds and my testosterone levels went from 90 to 40 in one month. To keep this momentum, I have been working on the following goals:

  • Stay under 110g of carbs per day
  • Consistently take my medication (post coming soon on medication I am taking)
  • 20 minutes of exercise per day

We all know the holidays are a time for joy, love, family, and…weight gain. I was on a great path before the holidays of being down 12 pounds, but alas. All that egg nog and holiday cider caught up with me.

I have been on a great path this past week, but I am sad to say I was up 2 pounds since my weigh in last Thursday. Here are the successes and challenges of the past week that I believe could have led to this weight gain:

  • Got back to exercising for the first time in MONTHS. I committed to begin exercising yesterday and continued momentum this morning with another workout!
  • Cut out alcohol during the week. Trust me, this is a BIG success because nothing makes me happier than a glass of wine after a good day. Or a hard day. Or any day.
  • Stayed low carb for virtually every meal. That includes saying no to some delicious and free office treats

  • Continue the momentum of this week’s workout success and work to meet my goal of 20 minutes of exercise…every day. For next week, I will aim for 4 out of the 7 days. If 7 happens, then AWESOME…but in my experience, going from 0 to 60 is not very maintainable
  • Last night was an especially late night, so I did not eat until after 9pm. I think this is a BIG reason I was not down this morning’s weigh in.

Since eating late from time to time is a reality for most of us busy people, here is some info I found on weight gain and eating late to help keep me motivated that I am moving in the right direction.

Eating late and weight gain:

The truth is…

“A calorie is a calorie,” says Mass. “If your total calorie intake for the day is greater than what you are burning, this can lead to weight gain regardless of what time it is.” But if you eat healthy, regular meals throughout the day and typically have dinner around 8 p.m., there’s no reason to stress.

Problem is, research suggests that many women take in nearly half of their daily calories at—or even after—dinner. One study found that a third of people consume 15 percent of their calories after 11pm.

What’s more, binging close to bedtime can increase your blood sugar levels for a full 24 hours, according to one study in Obesity of Research & Clinical Practice. Meanwhile, research in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicineshows that noshing on high-calorie, high-fat snacks at night can make for restless sleep. The result: Overeating the next day in a feeble attempt to boost your energy levels, says Mass.

There’s nothing wrong with eating a light, healthy snack after dinner as long as you plan for it as part of your daily calories. To keep from overeating, pay attention to your food while eating, avoid eating in front of the TV, and choose a portion-controlled snack.

When you’re trying to lose weight, eat regular meals and consume 90% of your calories before 8 p.m.  The benefit of eating meals every three to four hours is it helps regulate your blood sugar, and thus control hunger and cravings. That should leave you about 150 to 200 calories to play with for a late-night (and guilt-free!) snack.

What this means for me: Hopefully, late night eating will be prevented as I learn more about my new job AND find a way to balance the blog with work. I will NOT get discouraged about my weight today and will keep on keeping on.

Here are some great resources on eating late and weight gain I referred to in this article:

Insulin Resistance Diet: 110g of Carbs a Day

If you are like me, you have tried multiple diets from some carbs, to all carbs, to absolutely zero carbs. It seems that most diets are hard to maintain and really vary in results. It can be so frustrating to work hard and long for a change in your body, especially as you watch most of the men in your life scarf down an entire pizza or 10 chicken soft tacos for dinner while you are eating what they affectionately call, “rabbit food.”

I have come to learn that dieting is a reality for almost every woman I know. It is fascinating how different everyone’s bodies react to food and even more interesting as I learn more about how my body reacts to carbohydrates.

Diets and I have never been the best of friends. I struggle with the self control, especially during celebrations, weekends, stress, work trips, restaurants…you get the picture. I am happy to say that the diet discussed with my Endocrinologist really has been significantly more manageable than anything else I have tried in the past.

DISCLAIMER: I am not a Dietitian or Doctor, but I am someone who has spent a significant amount of time wondering why I could not lose weight and am now happily to report I have found an attainable approach.

Here are my rules of the road for food when it comes to food while battling Insulin Resistance and PCOS:

Stick to 110g of carbs every possible day

Let’s be real…not every day can be perfect and slip ups certainly happen (I have no idea how those chips and guacamole ended up in my mouth last night.) However, it is important to try to stick to 110g of carbs (this is ALL carbs including veggies) whenever I possibly can.

My Endocrinologist broke up the 110g of carbs like this for me: 30g of carbs per meal and 20g of carbs for snacks.

This can be tricky, but with the right tools, it really is quite manageable. Here is the app I use to get a ballpark amount of carbs in each thing I eat:

Whether you want to lose weight, manage your diabetes or improve your health; there are no quick fixes and fad diets don’t work. It’s your everyday food choices that count. That’s where there reliable and convenient guides come in.

To make the smart food choices that lead to permanent weight control, you must become aware of what you eat on a day-to-day basis. The CalorieKing Calorie, Fat & Carbohydrate Counter is the most accurate resource for calorie, fat & carbohydrate counts.

Take it everywhere; look up foods before you eat, when eating choices count the most! With over 15 million copies sold, this pocketsize guide consistently receives the highest average reader rating of all books of its kind and is recommended by health care professionals.

If you are like me and love your apps, you can download the app for free!

The app icon looks like this:

The user interface looks like this:

These are some of the great features:

  • Calorie and carb counts for 70,000+ foods
  • Most accurate and up-to-date database
  • Includes 260 fast food chains and restaurants
  • Great for people with diabetes tracking carb intake

Over time, you will find that you can remember how many carbs are in some of your favorite foods. You will get very good at counting the carbs in your head and making the right choices accordingly. This may seem tedious, but you will find that it gets easier over time and that there still are many delicious foods with no carbs.

Enjoy the carb free/low carb foods 

Comparing this low carb diet to other diets I have tried in the past, I have found myself enjoying foods that were restricted before and that my friends on low calorie diet cannot eat. Remember, for people with Insulin Resistance, it is more about carb monitoring than calorie monitoring.

Protein

All naturally-occurring meats contain no carbohydrates; however, pre-packaged and deli meats are often processed with a sugar and salt solution or seasoning blends, conferring carbohydrates to the meats. Processed and cured meats, such as sausage, ham, bacon, and frankfurters regularly contain small amounts of carbohydrates. Reading package labels is essential to learn if pre-packaged products contain carbohydrates. In their natural state, the following contain zero carbs:

  • Beef
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Fish (such as salmon, trout, and halibut)
  • Duck
  • Goose
  • Fish
  • Shellfish (such as crab, shrimp, and lobster)
  • Mollusks (such as oysters, mussels, and clams)
  • Game meats (such as venison and elk)
  • Exotic meats (such as ostrich and emu)
  • Eggs

Condiments, Seasoning, and Oils

Most condiments contain carbohydrates. Likewise, salad dressings and mayonnaise often contain some carbs because they are made with vinegar and may contain herbs. The following oils and condiments do not:

  • Salt
  • Vegetable, nut, and fruit oils such as avocado, grapeseed, safflower, canola, and olive oil
  • Animal fats like fish oil and lard
  • Some brands of margarine and shortening – read package labels

Sugar Substitutes

Aspartame, sucralose, stevia, and saccharine are all advertised as low-carb alternatives to sugar. Because they are so highly sweet, it only takes a little of a sugar substitute to go a long way. While these are likely to contain trace amounts of carbohydrates, you can effectively consider them no-carbohydrate foods; however, sweeteners may affect insulin in the same way sugar does, so proceed with caution. Additionally, sweeteners in granular form may contain carbohydrate-containing fillers.

Beverages

Many beverages contain zero carbohydrates; however, if they are sweetened with artificial sweetener, they may have some of the same caveats as listed above. Along with diet soda, Crystal Light, and other sweetened beverages, water, coffee, tea, and distilled alcohol contain zero carbohydrates. Use alcohol with caution, however, because your body prioritizes the alcohol first. This means that you burn alcohol before utilizing other fuel, including fat.

Don’t completely cut out carbs

Although reducing your carb consumption — when coupled with an increased protein intake — can help you control your overall calorie intake for weight loss and healthy weight management, your body does need carbohydrates on a daily basis to function properly. Consuming too few carbs can lead to nausea, headaches, dizziness, constipation, weakness and fatigue.

How carbs impact the body:

It is interesting to think abut carbs and how they play into the body.

You can appreciate this a lot more when you realize that there are eight essential amino acids and eight essential fatty acids required for life. These same nutrients are used all over the body for normal and constant metabolic processes such as repair of hair, skin, bone, muscle, red blood cells. Fat is used for energy purposes, protein only in ketosis.

Compare this to carbs, which have a very limited role around the body, in fact it’s only the brain that needs carbohydrates as a fuel source, most cellular processes are happy using fat. That’s one of the reasons why we are designed to carry so much of it around with us.

Carbs do provide us with fiber and minuscule but essential amounts of vitamins and minerals which are very difficult to store (unless they’re fat soluble), and if they’re not used at that time, they are passed through the body very quickly.

This means the main role of carbs is to top up the liver and muscles which are not as big a store as some people would realize. A closer look at the anatomy of a person reveals that the human liver can hold approx 80-100g of carbohydrates and the muscles can only hold 1-2% of carbs by volume, known as glycogen.

Be patient with yourself

Any change in your lifestyle takes time. Be patient with yourself and keep exploring trial & error as you navigate a diet that is best with you. With some patience and discipline, you will be on your way to a healthier you before you know it!

Here are some of the great resources that informed this post:

Weekend food: Survival food guide from someone with Insulin Resistance #MyCarbBreakup

The weekend is here. We wait all week long thinking it will never come around, then just when we think we can’t handle one more work request, homework assignment, or water cooler small talk topic…the weekend comes and saves us like an angel coming down from heaven scooping us up into complete bliss.

For most, the weekend is a time for rest, relaxation, and FOOD. I don’t know about you, but the weekends are the hardest time for me to be mindful of my Insulin Resistance. Whether is out to a restaurant, at a bar, or at a friend’s house it seems that there is more temptation than we typically experience during the week. Everyone else is having a “cheat” meal, so why can’t we? I know I have fallen into that mentality many, many times.

It is easy to know what you should and shouldn’t eat for a low carb diet, but it is certainly a lot harder when you are staring right at those chicken tenders and fries that are being offered to you by that friend we all have that never seems to look overweight…no matter what they eat.

I am certainly not a doctor and I know that everyone’s body handles foods very differently. I am however a woman with Insulin Resistance that knows my body handles food very uniquely and that when I must cut carbs, I can still enjoy certain foods that my friends on low calorie diets cannot.

My amazing Endocrinologist has put me on a limit of 110g of carbs a day…that includes ALL carbs, even veggies. These doctor’s orders don’t care that it’s the weekend, so here are some of my favorite indulgences over the weekend. By no means do these replace the taste of a baked potato, chicken tenders, rice pilaf, and virtually everything at Del Taco…but they do help when I know all those previously mentioned carbs and I have to breakup.

Foods:

1. Cheese. Cheese. Cheese.

This has honestly been my go to snack and something that has really gotten me through a low carb lifestyle because MOST CHEESES HAVE NO CARBS. That’s right none. When it comes to counting carbs, this is one of those amazing foods that are so satisfying and leave your daily carb count preserved for other foods.

My personal snack favorites are the lowfat Mozarella cheese sticks – they are easy to grab on the go (honestly, they are my breakfast most days) and pretty fun to eat. I am more of a salty fan over sweet, so all kinds of cheese really are my favorite thing.

This is also one of those foods I was limited to on past low calorie diets, so it almost feels like I am cheating my otherwise good diet behavior. Of course, be mindful of saturated fat…but remember for Insulin Resistance, it is about limiting carbs and not calories.

Cheese contains a host of nutrients like calcium, protein, phosphorus, zinc, vitamin A and vitamin B12. For more info on health benefits of cheese, check out this article: http://www.healthyeating.org/Milk-Dairy/Nutrients-in-Milk-Cheese-Yogurt/Nutrients-in-Cheese.aspx 
2. Caesar or wedge salads
In a lot of situations, full fat dressings have less carbs than fat free dressings. To me, a crispy salad drenched in dressing like blue cheese, ranch, or Caesar is surprisingly satisfying. The other good news about these is they are always easy to find on menus, especially bars. The croutons that often come with these are my little treat…you will find as you embrace low carb your stomach will start hurting when you eat carbs, so small amounts of croutons like these really hit the spot in just the right amount.
The fats in most salad dressings are typically vegetable oils, so-called “good fats” that help lower levels of “bad” LDL cholesterol. Having some fat in the salad dressing helps you make the most of the nutrients in the salad greens and other veggies. Carotenoids like lutein, lycopene, beta carotene and zeaxanthin require a little fat for absorption. These fat-soluble compounds are not only fun to say, but are also associated with reduced risk of heart disease, macular degeneration and even some cancers.And while the calories may be lower in many low-fat dressings, the missing fat is usually replaced with added sugars and starches, fake flavors and color enhancers.
Translation = get yourself some delicious salad dressing, add something tasty like shrimp, and you will be enjoying a lower carb treat.
3. Bacon!
Nitrate-free bacon has healthy fat, the perfect amount of protein and minimal carbs. I am not a huge pork eater, so my personal favorite is turkey bacon. Bacon really is something most people love and can help spice up those brunches with friends.Bacon also has some great health benefits! Several university and medical center studies have shown that including bacon as a regular, moderate part of one’s diet naturally works to lower the body’s blood pressure and blood sugar levels, helping to prevent and/or alleviate the effects of diabetes, as well as heart disease, stroke and heart attack. You can read more here: http://bacontoday.com/top-10-reasons-bacon-is-actually-healthy-for-you/
4. Sweet potato fries
Let’s be honest…fries are so awesome. Since french fries from white potatoes are one of my biggest tempters to get back together with carbs, I thought it was worth mentioning why exactly white potatoes really are like poison for someone with Insulin Resistance or PCOS. Potatoes are fat free, but they are also starchy carbohydrates with little protein.
According to Harvard, the carbs in potatoes are the kind that the body digests rapidly and have a high glycemic load. That is, they cause blood sugar and insulin to surge and then dip. This effect can make people feel hungry again soon after eating, which may lead to overeating. The rapid rise in blood sugar can also lead to increased insulin production. Jarzabkowski said, “The last thing I’d recommend to a diabetic is a potato.” Well my friends, I am struggling to find a way to argue with Harvard.
That being said, I know I am a human that can crave fries. When those moments strike, I find that several places now offer sweet potato fries. Of course, I do not love them as much as white potato fries, but a lot of places make sweet potato fries pretty tasty.
There are also some great health benefits of sweet potato fries! One health benefit of sweet potato french fries is the fries’ fiber content. Dietary fiber improves your cardiovascular health, helping prevent high cholesterol that increases your risk of heart disease. It also helps stabilize your blood sugar after a meal, preventing a blood sugar spike that leaves you hungry again shortly after eating.Check out more on sweet potato fries here: http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/health-benefits-sweet-potato-french-fries-2837.html
5. Dark chocolate
Yes, chocolate can be possible on a low carb diet! I should just drop the mic now.When it comes to chocolate, darker is usually healthier. Choose dark chocolate made from at least 70% cocoa solids or a low sugar white chocolate.How to choose your chocolate? Carefully check the wrapper and choose dark chocolate that hasn’t come in contact with any gluten-containing grains. Select chocolate produced organically by people working under fair conditions. Choose low carb chocolate by checking the nutrition information on the label for “net carbs.” And then…chocolate time.
6. Vodka soda with lime

Here is another great thing to enjoy on the weekend with NO CARBS. That’s right…none. There are of course many reasons why you should not over indulge in alcohol (including drunk dialing carbs), so be careful! When you are ready to enjoy a beverage, it is great to know that this is (like many other hard alcohols mixed with soda) your best bet. On days I am feeling extra sassy, I will do a splash of cranberry juice to spice it up. Just be careful when you order this…I have noticed most bartenders are pretty heavy handed with their cranberry pours.

My other go to beverage is red wine. Cabernet is one of the lower carb wines typically coming in at about 5g of carbs per glass. This can definitely add up, but I will admit I do really love a great glass of wine.

Here is a great article on alcohol on a low carb diet: http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/whattoeat/a/alcbev.htm

Here are some other great ideas for low carb beverages:

Here are some of the awesome resources that helped inform this article:

What are some of your favorite low carb weekend treats? Share them in the comments!